Archives for posts with tag: Hindu

The manifesto appeared on line yesterday 

About Brahmin nationalism he writes:

Saffronisation is a political neologism (after the saffron robes of the Brahmin clerics), used to refer to the policy of right-wing Brahmin nationalism (or Hindutva) which seeks to make the Indian state into a “Hindu nation” . These nationalist movements are also called Sanatana Dharma movements(untouchability, caste rule etc….)A related term, the Saffron Brigade, is used as a descriptor of people and organisations in India that promote Hindu nationalism such as the Sangh Parivar by their critics, who allege a militant Hindu agenda. The Sanatana Dharma movements or Brahmin nationalists in general are suffering from the same persecution by the Indian cultural Marxists as their European cousins. ………Marxists bring equal status for low caste peoples. 

The only positive thing about the Brahmin right wing is that they dominate the streets. They do not tolerate the muslims (in politics and high economy) and often riot and attack Muslims when things get out of control. This behaviour is nonetheless counterproductive. Because instead of attacking the Muslims they should target the category A and B traitors in India and consolidate military cells and actively seek the overthrow of the cultural Marxist government.
India will continue to wither and die unless the Brahmin nationalists consolidate properly and strike to win. It is essential that the European and Indian resistance movements learn from each other and cooperate as much as possible. Our goals are more or less identical.
The PCCTS, Knights Templar support the Sanatana Dharma movements and Indian nationalists in general.

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Madurai: After a decade-long struggle, Dalits at Panthapuli village in Tirunelveli district entered the Kannanallur Mariamman temple with help of district officials defying a ban imposed by caste Hindus.

Dalits led by District Collector G Prakash and Superintendent of Police Asra Garg, entered the temple at Panthapuli near Sankarankovil on Wednesday.

Though the caste Hindus resented the entry, they did not, however, make any effort to resist the move, apparently due to stern warning issued by Prakash.

The Collector has initiated speedy steps to take over the temple by the Hindu Religious and Charitable endowment Board. In order to prevent untoward incidents, police had been deployed in adequate numbers in the sensitive areas.

The temple, which was closed for nearly ten years due to conflict between Dalits and upper castes, has been opened and poojas would be performed on regular basis by all, officials said.

A section of the caste Hindu families resisted the entry of Dalits in the past even though the local munsiff court permitted them to enter the temple. Due to tension, both Dalits and the caste Hindus left their homes in the village and settled in nearby hills. The issue gained prominence after the CPM state unit recently threatened to take Dalits inside the temple. On December17, 200 CPM volunteers courted arrested, trying to enter the temple.

After this, the district administration initiated steps to facilitate the entry of Dalits into the temple.

“It is all government show now, they have done what we threatened to do”, said a local CPM leader.

When Sri Ram Sene attacked a Mangalore pub on January 24, they were called the moral police of the worst kind. Then a school girl, Ashwini, committed suicide. She was publicly humiliated by suspected Bajrang Dal men for being friends with a Muslim man, Salim. The group had dragged her to a police station, summoned her parents and forced Salim to write a letter of apology. Ashwini was harassed before the police, but the men have not been arrested yet. Salim has been taken into police custody, now charged with possible rape of a minor. For the saffron terrorist police, women might seem the soft target but it goes beyond that. Writer and activist Prof Pattabhirama Somayaji says: ”I would say the people who feel insecure are Muslims. Of late, Christians. And then, As you say, women.” Daughter of a Kerala CPM MLA, who was pulled out of a bus and attacked, made no secret of what her attackers had told her. ”They told me you are a Hindu, why do you want speak to Muslims?” Two cases in a row — one leading to the death of a minor girl. A violent form of parallel policing by saffron groups. It is not just a cause of concern for our women in public spaces, it also seems to be panning out, with a communal edge.

source: http://www.ndtv.com/convergence/ndtv/story.aspx?id=NEWEN20090083403&ch=2/13/2009%2012:20:00%20AM

by Archbishop Cheenath

Mumbai’s night of terror underscores a phenomenon concealed by the Indian governmentand intelligence agencies and deliberately ignored by a biased Anglo-American media for a long time: The rise of a virulent form of Hindu terrorism that begets violence from other minorities. Here is a list of almost one hundred groups that are fighting the Indian government. All of them thrive in India. The context for what has happened in Mumbai is stunning only for those unaware how a cocktail mix of wrong policies, official patronage to extremism, and separatist movements have come together to destabilize India. The night of Nov. 26, 2008 to Sep. 29, 2010  will go down in history as the days when India’s homegrown terrorism reared its head after years of silent mushroom growth.

This terrorism in Mumbai is not surprising, unlike the reactions in most of the western media. India’s terrorist underground has been flourishing for many years. While the U.S. media was busy last year likening Pakistan to Iraq in a politically motivated campaign aligned with U.S. military objectives, experts were ranking India only second to Iraq in the number of people who died as a result of terrorist attacks between 2002 to 2010, according to one survey by an American think tank.

The Indian government has been artfully concealing a worrying development for at least sixteen years under an organized hype centered on economic growth and military power projection with a focus on China and Pakistan.

Indian terrorism is a confusing mix. Journalists and observers outside the region often miss the simmering tensions beneath the surface that occasionally burst into the open, surprising many and raising questions like how could there be so much violence in what is supposed to be a secular democracy and a rising economy where such things should not happen.

In India, there is a cocktail mix of wrong policies, official patronage to extremism, and separatist movements, all coming together to destabilize India. At least 600 Christians, churches, nuns and priests were targeted by Hindu mobs in eastern India in August this year. Almost the entire Muslim population of Kashmir is up in arms against the excesses, arrests, murders and rapes by the Indian army. For years there has been a media trial of Indian Muslims for real and imaginary involvement in violence. News such as the arrest this month of two serving Indian army officers involved in crimes that were attributed to Indian Muslims has served to increase disgruntlement among minorities. In 2002, close to 2,500 Indian Muslim men, women and children were burned alive in the first religious genocide of 21st century. In 1984, Sikhs were hauled off buses in New Delhi and beaten or burned to death following the assassination of Indian prime minister Indra Gandhi at the hands of Sikh bodyguards. And finally, between 12 to 14 separatist insurgencies currently rage across India’s north and northeast.

All of this makes for a dangerous combination that simmers quietly under the surface. The Indian media’s self-imposed ban on discussing these problems helps keep the lid on them. But when the pressure becomes unbearable, things occasionally burst into the open in the shape of terrorist acts. This only surprises those who do no know how India has been gradually relapsing into religious extremism in the period between 1990 and 2010. This history is important in order to understand why the Indian claims of Pakistani complicity in the attacks have often sought to simplify a complex situation.

Hindu militant groups have mushroomed in the past few years. In 2008 arrest of two serving Indian army officers has confirmed speculation that Hindu terrorist groups have infiltrated Indian military and political establishments.

1992 was the definite year that saw Hindu fundamentalism express itself politically. Hundreds of religious terrorists descended on a north Indian city with tools in hand. They climbed on top of a majestic, 500-year-old mosque built by the same Muslim rulers who built the famous Taj Mahal. Imbibed with religious hatred, the Hindu mobs razed the building to the ground. Indian government authorities did nothing to stop it.

This Indian betrayal of a carefully crafted secular image would prove fatal later. In 1999, a Hindu mob surrounded the car of Graham Staines, an Australian priest, and his underage boy and girl and burned them alive.

Australia maintained an unusual quiet till this day about this major act of terrorism. The bias is easily detectable when compared to Australia’s reaction and statements to ‘Muslim terrorism’, especially in Indonesia and later in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

In this sense, countries like United States, Britain and Australia are partially responsible for letting the growth of India terrorism – with its mix of Hindu, Muslim, Sikh, Christian and ethnic insurgencies – go unnoticed for so many years. These western countries have done this in order not to disturb the Anglo-Saxon project of grooming India as a bulwark against China and Russia and other regional powers.

Following is a list of various indigenous separatist, militant and terrorist organizations operating in India against the Indian federal government. This list has been compiled using information available in the public domain, news reports and specialized publications. During any given incident in India, a combination of some or all of these organizations is a suspect, including in the Mumbai blasts and in any other militant activity. Blaming Kashmiris or Pakistanis for Indian internal problems would be a factual misrepresentation that must be countered with full force by Pakistan.

It should also be noted that the Indian establishment is cracking down on Tamil separatists due to violence in Sri Lanka as Tamils are regrouping in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Tamils have to their credit the last significant political assassination in India, the blowing up of former Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi in 1984. They continue to be the most ruthless terror outfit in India. Mumbai blasts carry the fingerprints of many terror groups operating inside India, each with a long list of grievances against the Indian government and enough motivation to carry out such terrorist acts.

Not all groups in this list are necessarily terrorist organizations. But all of them are active against the Indian government.

Hindu Terror Master

NEW DELHI — For the first time in this Hindu-majority nation of 1.1 billion people, the police have announced the arrest of people who are accused of being part of a Hindu terrorist cell.
Brijesh Singh/Reuters

Times Topics: India

Members of a right-wing Hindu group, Bajrang Dal, offering prayers last month in Agra, India.

Pragya Singh Thakur, shown in 2007, has been arrested in a September bombing.

Police officials in western Maharashtra State said they had arrested the nine suspects and charged them with murder and conspiracy in connection with the bombing in September of a Muslim-majority area in Malegaon, a small city. Six people, all Muslims, died in the explosion, which was among a string of terrorist attacks in Indian cities in recent months.

Blame for several of these attacks has been placed on radical Islamist groups; one group, calling itself Indian Mujahedeen, claimed responsibility for several attacks. But the arrests of the Hindu suspects in the Malegaon bombing raised the possibility of another source of terrorism, involving a radical Hindu fringe.

“This is a very dangerous trend,” said Ajit Doval, former chief of India’s Intelligence Bureau, who added that it could undercut efforts to bolster pluralism in India.

Those arrested by the police antiterrorism squad in Maharashtra over the past two weeks included a Hindu nun with links to the principal opposition party, the Bharatiya Janata Party, and an army colonel, who is suspected of having provided ammunition and training to the bombers.

The Indian Army has long viewed itself as being free of ideological or political bias, so the arrest of an army officer was deeply troubling to the military. “I can tell you that we are taking it seriously,” said the defense minister, A. K. Antony.

The arrests reinforced growing suspicions over the last few years of a potential threat from Hindu extremists. In August, two members of a right-wing Hindu group called the Bajrang Dal were killed while assembling bombs in the northern industrial city of Kanpur. In 2006, two people who were thought to belong to the same group died under similar circumstances in a bomb-making workshop in Nanded.

Officials in the Central Bureau of Investigation told reporters in New Delhi on Saturday that investigators had established a link between the Nanded group and the Malegaon bombing.

Bal Thackeray, the leader of another Hindu hard-line group, the Shiv Sena, wrote in June in the group’s weekly magazine that Hindus should defend themselves from Islamist attacks by forming their own squads of suicide bombers.

“The threat of Islamic terror in India is rising,” Mr. Thackeray wrote, according to a translation from the Marathi language that was published in The Hindu, a national English-language daily. “It is time to counter the same with Hindu terror. Hindu suicide squads should be readied to ensure the existence of Hindu society and to protect the nation.”

Prosecutors said that investigators of the Malegaon bombing on Sept. 29 traced a motorcycle at the site of the explosion, apparently used to plant the bomb, to a Hindu nun named Pragya Singh Thakur, 37, who lives nearby in Gujarat State. While in college, Ms. Thakur was a member of the student wing of the Bharatiya Janata Party, according to Vishnu Dutt Sharma, a senior leader of the student wing.

Mr. Sharma described Ms. Thakur as “aggressive in her speeches and work.” She was religious and studious, Mr. Sharma said, and did postgraduate work in history.

During a pilgrimage in 2007, Ms. Thakur renounced a worldly life and became a nun, or a sadhvi in Hindi, cutting her hair short and donning orange robes, the sacred color of Hinduism, according to a brother-in-law, Bhagwan Jha. After she became a nun, her name was changed to Purnachetnanand Giri, which means complete consciousness.

Ms. Thakur’s lawyer, Naveen Chomal, said she had done nothing wrong and that the police had arrested her only because her motorcycle was found at the site of the bombing. The police have said they also have taped telephone conversations in which Ms. Thakur wondered aloud why the Malegaon bombing had not inflicted a higher death toll.

Some people have begun to treat the suspects as heroic figures. Several Hindu organizations have rallied to Ms. Thakur’s side, contributing to a fund for her legal defense.

Her father, Chandrapal Singh Thakur, told The Times of India, a national daily newspaper: “If the government doesn’t act in time, common people will have to do something about their own safety. I pray that she succeeds in her endeavors.”

Mr. Thakur has placed a photograph of his daughter on the family altar. The Bharatiya Janata Party has issued statements defending Ms. Thakur.

Her arrest led police investigators to several other suspects, including Lt. Colonel Shrikant Prasad Purohit. At the time of his arrest, Colonel Purohit was posted with the Indian Army’s education corps, studying Chinese.

A prosecutor, Ajay Misar, said that Colonel Purohit had helped the bombers obtain money, arms and training. “He supplied six pistols and 196 cartridges to the other accused,” Mr. Misar said in a telephone interview.

Dinesh Aggarwal, an inspector in the antiterrorism squad, said the suspects were part of a larger conspiracy. “Their precise role will be known after the investigation is completed,” he said.

The terrorist bombings have become a major political issue, with state elections scheduled for later this month and a national election expected next spring.

The opposition party, the Bharatiya Janata Party, initially distanced itself from Ms. Thakur, but acknowledged that she had been part of its student wing after photographs of her with prominent party leaders were published. Recently, the party has defended her. And the party’s chief minister of Gujarat State, Narendra Modi, accused the government of maligning the army’s image by arresting Colonel Purohit as a pre-election ploy.

BBC News at One

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posted on BBC News (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7739541.stm)

A new and highly controversial phrase has entered the sometimes cliche-riddled Indian press: “Hindu terrorism”.

As with the term “Islamic terrorism” and “Christian fundamentalism”, this latest addition to the media lexicon is highly emotive.

It was in the aftermath of the 29 September bomb blast in the predominantly Muslim town of Malegaon in the western state of Maharashtra that the term “Hindu terrorism” or “saffron terrorism” came to be used widely.

That was because the state police’s Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS) arrested 10 Hindus following the blasts and has said that it wants to arrest several more.

Little-known

1.  Female priest, Sadhwi Pragya Singh Thakur, aged 38, who has been accused by the ATS of being involved in the Malegaon blast.

Hindu devotee in Nasik

2. Lt-Col Prasad Srikant Purohit,Indian army officer who the ATS says is the prime accused in the case.

3. Col Raikar and  Maj Prabhakar Kulkarni, retired army officer is also under arrest.

Police are investigating whether some of those arrested are members of a little-known Hindu outfit called Abhinav Bharat (Young India).

His vision was to militarise India to fight the British Government.

Military-style training

Its aim, as its website claims, is to “encourage students to take up careers in the armed forces of the country”.

Military training involves teaching students how to fire guns. The students are prepared for the National Defence Academy, the central government’s premier military college. The branch of the academy in the city of Nasik has many impressive buildings. One of them is used to impart military-style training to students, aged 10-16 years.

They have hired lawyers to represent her and at every legal hearing in Nasik supporters of right-wing parties gather outside the court and shout anti-government slogans. All eyes will be now be on the court proceedings -to find out whether “Hindu terrorist will punished by government.

New Delhi, July 17: The government said on Friday that it was aware that elements in certain right wing Hindu outfits were allegedly involved in terror activities in the country.

“We are aware about that,” Union Home Secretary Gopal K Pillai told journalists when asked about reports that elements in certain right wing Hindu outfits were allegedly involved in some bomb explosions in the country.

Pillai, however, did not specify which outfits were involved in such acts.

The CBI, which is probing into the Mecca Masjid and Ajmer blast cases, has recently said that the agency did not question any RSS functionary during the probe.

Central Bureau of Investigation Director Ashwani Kumar had said that the reports about the agency questioning Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh leaders in connection with the terror attacks in Mecca Masjid and Ajmer were not correct.

–PTI–